CAPS I&I and Methods Cores Town Hall: John Sauceda, PhD -- Intro to the Multiphase Optimization Strategy (MOST) Framework for Intervention Science

Lecture/Seminar
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550 16th St., 3rd Floor, Room 3700
San Francisco, CA 94143
United States

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The NIH and the Office of Behavioral and Social Science Research (OBSSR) have explicit calls for researchers to combine, personalize and/or sequence interventions to optimize treatment outcomes. These calls are in large part due to the development of the MOST framework, which is an engineering-inspired approach to building multi-component behavioral and bio-behavioral interventions. This talk will describe the classic "treatment package" approach to intervention science, and how the MOST approach differs.  We’ll go over the three phases of MOST when the goal is to optimize health outcomes.

 Dr. John A. Sauceda is a health psychologist and Assistant Professor at the Center for AIDS Prevention Studies at UCSF. His research focuses on the drivers of HIV treatment and care outcomes among Latinx patients, including depression and structural factors, and highlights the complexities of research for immigrant communities and in Spanish. He works with Latinx patients at the SALUD Clinic within Ward 86 HIV Clinic at ZSFGH and within the CFAR Network of Integrated Clinical Systems (CNICS) cohort.  Dr. Sauceda came to CAPS from the Univ. of Texas at El Paso as a postdoctoral fellow in the TAPS Fellowship Program. He currently has a K01 award (NIMH) to conduct a sequential multiple assignment randomized trial (a tool in MOST), and is working on a proposal to build a factorial design for a multi-component intervention (another tool in MOST). He has completed the MOST certification program from Penn State University.

 

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Add to Calendar 2019-09-24 11:00:00 2019-09-24 12:30:00 CAPS I&I and Methods Cores Town Hall: John Sauceda, PhD -- Intro to the Multiphase Optimization Strategy (MOST) Framework for Intervention Science   The NIH and the Office of Behavioral and Social Science Research (OBSSR) have explicit calls for researchers to combine, personalize and/or sequence interventions to optimize treatment outcomes. These calls are in large part due to the development of the MOST framework, which is an engineering-inspired approach to building multi-component behavioral and bio-behavioral interventions. This talk will describe the classic "treatment package" approach to intervention science, and how the MOST approach differs.  We’ll go over the three phases of MOST when the goal is to optimize health outcomes.  Dr. John A. Sauceda is a health psychologist and Assistant Professor at the Center for AIDS Prevention Studies at UCSF. His research focuses on the drivers of HIV treatment and care outcomes among Latinx patients, including depression and structural factors, and highlights the complexities of research for immigrant communities and in Spanish. He works with Latinx patients at the SALUD Clinic within Ward 86 HIV Clinic at ZSFGH and within the CFAR Network of Integrated Clinical Systems (CNICS) cohort.  Dr. Sauceda came to CAPS from the Univ. of Texas at El Paso as a postdoctoral fellow in the TAPS Fellowship Program. He currently has a K01 award (NIMH) to conduct a sequential multiple assignment randomized trial (a tool in MOST), and is working on a proposal to build a factorial design for a multi-component intervention (another tool in MOST). He has completed the MOST certification program from Penn State University.   550 16th St., 3rd Floor, Room 3700 San Francisco, CA 94143 United States View on Map [email protected] Division of Prevention Science America/Los_Angeles public